Writing Therapy

 

Have you ever engaged in writing for healing? Psychologists have long known that writing can help clients sort through and process their emotions. Now researchers are finding that writing can provide insights that help us do better physically, from boosting our immune system to functioning better with things like asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. [More info here: http://www.apa.org/monitor/jun02/writing.aspx]

Writing as therapy is great because it’s accessible to us all the time, and it doesn’t cost anything! Whether you like to write longhand (and for some this more tactile approach is especially beneficial—for example, it’s been proven that writing things down helps us remember them!) or using a computer keyboard, there are many types of writing that can be therapeutic.

Free writing. This is a very open-ended style of journaling—you can literally write about whatever comes to mind. I do this mostly when something is bothering me and I need to spend some time and energy quietly processing what is really going on or what I’m supposed to learn from the experience. Don’t edit yourself; just write what comes to mind. Sometimes you’ll get great insights!

Expressive writing. This is more of an exercise in which you pick a specific event, usually something troubling or traumatic, and you deliberately write about deeper and negative feelings to find meaning in them. It can be difficult, but this process has helped people stop ruminating about things that bother them. It can yield real healing, both mentally and physically. We can look for a therapist to help us with this type of healing process if we need to.

Reflective journaling. This is when we write about a specific experience or event, like a class we took or a project we participated in, and we write about what happened, how we feel about it, and what we learned. How did it help you grow as a person? It’s best to write shortly after the activity, and it’s fun to look back at previous entries to see how far we’ve come!

Keeping a gratitude journal. At the end of each day, or at least once or twice a week, it’s a good practice to write down what we’re grateful for. Research has shown that counting our blessings has a positive effect on our subjective well-being (reducing depression, for example). It also helps us sleep better and generally take better care of ourselves.

Letter writing. If you have unfinished business with a someone hanging over your head, writing everything you want to say in a letter can be extremely cathartic, even if you never send it.

Writing poetry. When we write a poem, we draw from our life experiences to really express ourselves in a creative way. Sometimes people have been able to use poetry to find meaning and perspective when dealing with a serious illness at the end of their lives. I imagine that it could be therapeutic to write a song or a short story based on our life experiences and viewpoints as well.

These are some of the ways to use composing to heal. Do you have other ways to use writing to sort things out, let things go, or reflect on the meaning of your experiences?

Source:https://www.mindbodygreen.com/articles/can-you-really-use-writing-as-therapy

Category : Blog &Personal Growth Posted on May 23, 2018

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