Medical Arts: Alternative, Complementary, Quackery? Part One

Sometimes people ask me what I think about remedies like “rainbow therapy,” or suggest that I consider selling a pyramid marketing brand of essential oils.

I have to be very diplomatic when talking about specific approaches to health. Of course, I have my opinions about detox cleanses, or eating according to our blood type, or gemstone healing—but they are only my opinions. It’s important for each of us to do our own research and decide for ourselves.

In his somewhat cynical article “Wellness Brands Like Gwyneth Paltrow’s GOOP Wage War on Science,” Timothy Caulfield pits the wellness industry against mainstream medicine (link provided below). In case you read it, for whatever it’s worth, I would like to diplomatically share my humble opinion about a few points for your consideration.

Full disclosure: I don’t know anything about GOOP or other specific high-profile health brands. Somehow I was (happily) unaware that Gwyneth Paltrow was in the business of bashing science or that it had become popular to make fun of her for it. The first thing that bothered me about Caulfield’s article is that it takes an extreme all-or-nothing stance: you either completely buy into trendy wellness gimmicks (which in his estimation are ALWAYS hooey because they lack scientific foundations), or you are fully entrenched in a “science-informed approach to health.” I don’t know anyone who has jumped on the alternative bandwagon to the extent of completely turning away from science. Who among us is gullible enough to believe every far-fetched gimmick that comes along?

But secondly, and all kidding aside, not every “alternative” approach is new, and not every offering is phony. Caulfield makes reference to a “life force energy that runs through mysterious meridians,” but these meridians are not mysterious to physicians who have been practicing Traditional Chinese Medicine for thousands of years. In fact, we can now explain a lot of these phenomena in western medical terms as we learn more about a connective tissue called fascia, and discover just how complex all the cells of the body really are in their communication to and cooperation with each other (via chemical and/or electromagnetic energy, for example—life force energies indeed!).

Western medicine is the young science. Are there snake oil salespersons out there? Most definitely. But just because we can’t explain something (yet), doesn’t mean it can’t work. Sometimes the proof is in the outcome.

Caulfield makes some very good points about how eating healthy these days sometimes feels like it has to include specific (expensive) components, and how an unintended consequence has been making “healthy” too confusing or so expensive that some people might avoid produce completely if they can’t afford just the right organic varieties.

Still, Caulfield concludes that the answer is ALWAYS looking to science and completely dismissing the trendy “new” alternatives. But I would contend that sometimes “science” gets it wrong. Sometimes conventional doctors really do just treat symptoms rather than taking a more holistic look at big picture/root causes. Sometimes alternative strategies may really be the better path to health and wellness.

Next week, I’ll look at how we don’t even have to choose between mainstream and alternative—these two seemingly different approaches really can play nicely together!

https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinion/wellnes-brands-gwyneth-paltrow-s-goop-wage-war-science-ncna801436

Category : Blog &Health Posted on December 13, 2017

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