Make One Change (Just as an Experiment)

 

At last weekend’s reflexology workshop (Say Goodbye to Headaches!), we talked about causes of stress, and how we can encourage clients—f they’re willing—to make little changes, to control what they can.

Often, the kind of language that works well for any of us, is something like: would you be willing to try this one (new thing), just as an experiment?

That’s a lot less intimidating than attempting a complete overhaul, isn’t it? 

This month’s “Better Homes and Gardens” has an interesting article called “What Happens When…?” It looks at some pretty questionable—but common—habits and breaks down why they’re bad for our health. Here are some examples:

  • Hitting the snooze button repeatedly. We could feel groggy for up to an hour afterward! The alarm signals our brains that it’s time to rise. If we keep going back to sleep after, we confuse our brains! Better to set a “real” alarm for a time when we can realistically get up, and keep the same routine daily.
  • Postponing going to the bathroom. If we need to pee and we put it off, we increase our chance of getting a UTI—urinary tract infection. This is especially true for women.
  • Brushing our teeth only once a day. Skipping a daily cleansing increases our chance of developing tooth decay by 33%! The bacteria in our mouths also increase our chances of getting gum disease.
  • Sweating and not drinking enough water. Hey, we talked about this in our headache class! What happens is we get dehydrated. In addition to headaches, this can cause fatigue, dizziness, muscle cramping, constipation and more. Experts vary in their recommendations for how much water is enough, but as a general rule, we want our urine to appear pale yellow to almost clear. If it’s darker, you’re probably not drinking enough water.
  • Taking a break from exercise. The bad news is that just one or two weeks away from our fitness routine does have some negative effects: our metabolism slows a little, our muscles use less oxygen, and our speed and endurance suffer (strength doesn’t diminish as quickly, though). The good news is that just one or two weeks getting back into our groove reverses any losses!
  • Eating food we drop. Would it surprise you to know that there’s no “five-second rule”? Bacteria can transfer to food immediately. Perhaps what is a surprise is that the type of surface the food is dropped on doesn’t really matter—the moisture content of the food is what really determines the germiness. Wetter food picks up more bacteria. So, if you really want to still eat something after you’ve dropped it, let the cleanliness of the surface and the moistness of the food guide your decision.
  • Not covering our mouths when we sneeze. Germs in the droplets of our expulsion can travel up to 26 feet for a sneeze, and 19.5 feet for coughs—and they can stay suspended for up to 10 minutes! The best practice is to use a tissue to cover your nose AND mouth. If you don’t have a tissue handy, cover your lower face the best you can with the crook of your arm, not your hand. If you sneeze into your hand and then you touch something like a doorknob or handrail, you’re laying the germs out for someone else to pick up.
  • Scratching an itch. Scratching certainly provides temporary relief, but it backfires in the long run. We trigger a tiny bit of pain—just enough to numb the itch. But at the same time, we release serotonin, which sends an “itch” signal to the brain. So when the “pain” fades, the itch is actually stronger. Better to leave it alone, rub the area with your palm, or make circles on the affected skin for a few minutes with an ice cube.

Interesting, huh? Would you be willing to stop hitting the snooze alarm, stop scratching itches, start drinking more water, exercising more regularly or covering up better when you sneeze? Do you have any other unhealthy habit—just one—that you’d be willing to try a better solution for, just as an experiment?

Source: “What Happens When…?” by Karen Repinski, “Better Homes and Gardens,” September 2018.

Category : Blog &Health &Personal Growth &Reflexology Posted on August 29, 2018

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